SPRING CONFERENCE 2019

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

The Castleknock Hotel, Dublin 4th & 5th April

13.5 External CPD credits (Wednesday - 1 credit, Thursday - 6.5 credits & Friday - 6 credits)

WELCOME

PROGRAMME

MOVIE NIGHT

‘First Reformed’ is a brooding, thriller-drama centred around Ernst Toller (Ethan Hawke), a troubled priest of a small, historical church in upstate New York, who starts to spiral out of control after a soul-shaking encounter with Mary (Amanda Seyfried) and her husband Michael, an unstable environmental activist. Consumed by thoughts that the world is in danger and motivated by the church’s lack of action, Toller embarks on a perilous self-assigned undertaking with the hope that he may finally restore the faith and purpose he’s been longing for in his mission to right the wrongs done to so many.

This will be followed by a led discussion with Dr Peter Byrne after the movie. 1 CPD credit will be available for attendance to the discussion

19.30 – 20.00
Arrival and Refreshments

20.00 – 22.00
Movie

22.00
Discussion facilitated by Dr Peter Byrne

09.15 – 10.15
OPENING SESSION – History of Psychiatry and the College in Ireland – CHAIR: Ms Miriam Silke – Chief Executive
Dr John Hillery – President of the College
Prof Greg Swanwick – Dean of the College
Dr Justin Brophy –Inaugural President of the College

10.15 – 11.00
Premature mortality in severe mental illness: New solutions for an old problem that’s getting worseCHAIR: Prof Paul Fearon
Dr Peter Byrne, Royal London Hospital
This is a talk about the application of evidence-based public health, medical and psychiatric methods, including co-production with service users, to reduce the seven main drivers of premature deaths in people with severe mental illness.

11.00 – 11.30
COFFEE BREAK AND POSTER EXHIBITION

11.30 – 13.00
YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH – A Global Challenge CHAIR: Prof Mary Cannon
Prof Pat McGorry – Australia
Mental Health Reform is becoming a major world-wide priority. One of the key reasons is the belated recognition that so much of the lost potential and economic damage that results from mental illness has to do with its timing in the life cycle. The inclusion of mental health in the UN sustainable development goals, the creation of a global mental health movement and serious political and advocacy campaigns, plus the World Economic Forum’s support for mental health reform have all highlighted youth mental health as a key focus. The design and scaling up of new integrated youth mental health models of care in a growing number of countries has established a base camp for reform, for new research possibilities and for transformational change in mental health care. These developments will be described and their relevance to Ireland will be discussed with the audience.

Followed by a panel discussion – Addressing the gap between services and needs for young people
Panelists: Ms Helen Coughlan, Prof Barbara Dooley, Dr Michele Hill, Dr Kate Irvine, Dr Helen Keeley,  Mr Niall MacDhonnagáin, Dr Josen McGrane, Dr Emmet Power,  Dr Eric Roche

13.00 – 14.00
LUNCH

14.00 – 15.15
PARALLEL SESSIONS – PART 1
Session 1, 2, 3 or 4

Session 1 CO-CHAIRS: Prof David Cotter & Dr John Lyne

Irish Psychosis Network – New Advances – Part 1 (to be continued after the coffee break)

Implementation of RISE: A Hub and Spoke EIP service in Cork
Dr Karen O’ Connor – Consultant Psychiatrist, Cork
Conducting clinical trials in first episode psychosis, with RCTs in Physical health interventions and dose reduction as examples
Dr Brian O’Donoghue Senior Research Fellow & Consultant Psychiatrist, Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health
Psychological therapies for early psychosis – combining CBT and CRT
Prof Gary Donohue – Dept of Psychology, NUI Galway

Session 2

PCS Session

Session 3

Health Economics
Dr Caragh Behan

Session 4

Communications – Part 1

Session 5

Personality Disorders Special Interest Group – The MBT Programme
Dr Evelyn McCabe

15.15 – 15.45
COFFEE BREAK

15.45 – 17.00
PARALLEL SESSIONS – PART 2

Session 1(continued), 5, 6, 7, or 8

Session 6 CO-CHAIRS: Dr Karen O'Connor & Prof Colm McDonald

Irish Psychosis Network – New Advances (Part 2)

Changes in self-concept and risk of adolescent psychotic experiences: a longitudinal population based cohort study
Mr Colm Healy – Dept of Psychiatry , RCSI
If socially deprived areas have higher rates of psychosis, do they also have worse outcomes?
Dr Paddy Power – Consultant Psychiatrist, St Patrick’s Mental Health Services, Dublin
Can we predict who among the UHR will transition to psychotic Disorder?
Dr David Mongan – ICAT Wellcome Trust HRB Fellow, Dept of Psychiatry, RCSI
Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in First Episode Psychosis: An International Collaborative Mega-analysis of Individual Patient Data
Dr Brian Hallahan – Consultant Psychiatrist, Galway

Session 7

Music for your Mental Health (Choir Workshop)

This is a singing workshop for the College Choir – to be followed by a short performance at the Fellowship ceremony. All are welcome. Singing essential

Session 8 CHAIR: Dr Aideen Moran

Perinatal Mental Health
Dr Catherine Hinds – The Maudsley, London

Session 9

Communications Workshop – Part 2

Session 10

Patient Safety and Open Disclosure
Ms Angela Tysall – National Lead in Open Disclosure, HSE QID

17:00
COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS OF IRELAND ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

19.00 – 19.30
FELLOWSHIP CEREMONY

19.30 – 20.00
DRINKS RECEPTION (included in dinner booking)

20.00 – Late
GALA DINNER & Entertainment by the Camembert Quartet
(free seating, partners welcome)

From 08.45
REGISTRATION

09.20 – 09.30
WELCOME ADDRESS AND INTRODUCTION
Dr William Flannery, Vice President and Conference Academic Co-ordinator

09.30 – 11.00
Autism Spectrum Disorder Plenary Session Chair: Prof Louise Gallagher

9.30 – 10.05
Mr Adam Harris – ASIAM

10.05 – 10.45
ASD and its comorbidities in adulthood
Dr Mark Woodbury-Smith
In this talk I will describe the presentation of ASD in adulthood, including the potential overlap and confusion with related disorders impacting social interaction and communication. I will describe the common comorbidities and the service needs for this population, and give consideration to how existing services might work together to best meet the needs of this population. In view of an increase in prevalence, along with an emerging interest from industry in developing ‘treatments’ for this condition, there are many ethical as well as conceptual considerations that add to the complexity of this topic.

10.45 – 11.00
DISCUSSION

11.00 – 11.30
COFFEE BREAK AND POSTER EXHIBITION

11.30 – 13.00
Mid Morning Session CHAIR: Dr Gerry McCarney

11.30 – 12.10
The impact of social technologies on the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people
Dr Mary Aiken – Adjunct Associate Professor, Geary Institute for Public Policy, University College Dublin
Cyberpsychologist Professor Aiken will discuss principal aspects of social technologies, from impact on physical and mental wellbeing, to environmental psychology of growing up in Cyberspace, through to developmental, social and clinical implications regarding same. From the contentious screen time debate, to devices and platforms that are actively designed to addict, she will discuss the challenges of existing and emerging forms of social media, for children and young people, and importantly for CAMH clinicians, researchers and practitioners

12.10 – 12.55
Treating people with personality disorder in general mental health services
Prof Anthony Bateman
Personality disorder (PD) is a common condition in the general population and is found with increasing prevalence in mental health services and prison populations. General psychiatrists and community mental health teams have to offer treatment and yet many practitioners feel they lack the skill. The types of personality disorder that cause considerable concern in services are borderline (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Their mental health needs are neglected.

BPD and ASPD are major mental disorder characterised by a mix of interpersonal problems, emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and cognitive sensitivity. The disorders are more than the sum of their parts and treatment that aims at one part is inadequate as a treatment for the disorder itself. All major national guidelines recommend psychosocial treatment as the primary method of intervention for people with BPD and ASPD. Other treatments, such as use of medication, are currently considered to be adjuncts to a psychosocial approach. But evidence based specialist treatments are not available and so most people with personality disorder are treated in general mental health services.

A number of specialist psychosocial treatments will be discussed in this presentation with an emphasis on their commonality rather than difference. An outline of principles followed in psychosocial approaches will be presented and the evidence base summarised. This evidence has given rise to basic principles to be followed in the treatment of people with PD who are unable to access specialist intervention. These are organised as structured clinical management/general psychiatric management. The clinical skills required to implement this generic treatment in general mental health services are already within the competence of staff.

13.00 – 14.00
LUNCH

14.00 – 16.30
Friday Afternoon Session

14.00 – 14.35
Psychiatrists should all be independent clinical trialists
Professor Robert Howard – University College London
In the autumn years of my career, I can’t help but reflect how little extra we have to offer our patients compared to when I joined the profession 30 years ago. While it is true that basic Neuroscience knowledge has advanced, applications of this to mental health are often simplistic and add nothing to the treatment and care that we provide. There’s little glamour to clinical trials and scientists have traditionally looked down their noses at those who conduct them. Industry trials are complicated by understandable conflicts of interest. But, academically-conceived and independently conducted trials are a way that all of us can work to push forward knowledge about what works and what doesn’t. Irish Psychiatry has a great track record in this area, and you, and we, should do a lot more.

14.35 – 16.30 Decriminalisation/Legalising of Cannibis use of medicinal/recreational reasons CHAIR: Dr William Flannery

14.35 – 15.05
Dr Marta de Forti – Clinician Scientist MRC Research Fellow, King’s College London

15.05 – 15.35
Prof Sir Robin Murray

15.35 – 16.00
Dr Matt Sadlier – Connolly Hospital, Dublin

16.00 – 16.30
Panel Discussion
Dr Maria de Forti, Prof Sir Robin Murray,  Dr Matt Sadlier, Dr Eamon Keenan, Dr Mike Scully and Prof Mary Cannon

BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS

MARY AIKEN


ANTHONY BATEMAN


CARAGH BEHAN


JUSTIN BROPHY


PETER BYRNE


MARY CANNON


MARTA DI FORTI


ADAM HARRIS


CATHERINE HINDS


JOHN HILLERY


DR JOHN HILLERY was a Consultant Psychiatrist in the services for people with intellectual disability run by Stewarts Care, Dublin and St. John of God Kildare Services as well as the HSE Mental Health Services at Tallaght. He resigned in February this year. He is a former President of the Medical Council and the International Association of Medical Regulatory Authorities. Dr Hillery was also a member of the Council of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland and of the Independent Monitoring Group of A Vision for Change (the national policy on Mental Health). He is currently the President of the College of Psychiatrists of Ireland having formerly been the Director of Communications and Public Education.

ROB HOWARD


EAMON KEENAN


LORCAN MARTIN


DR LORCAN MARTIN is Director of Professional Competence in the College of Psychiatrists of Ireland. He is a Consultant in General Adult Psychiatry with Longford/Westmeath Mental Health Services. He trained in Trinity College and with the Eastern Health Board as was. His special area of interest is greater integration of mental health services into the community and he has been instrumental in developing many new initiatives in this regard including a Primary Care Liaison Service, a service for deaf clients, an ongoing public mental health awareness programme and a consultative group so that service users/carers may be involved in service development. He has presented these projects and others at a number of international conferences. Dr Martin has also been involved in training programmes in the area of mental health for a number of statutory and voluntary agencies, and also has a particular interest in the clinical training and examination of non-consultant hospital doctors working in psychiatry.

EVELYN MCCABE


PAT MCGORRY


ROBIN MURRAY


JEREMY PARR


MATT SADLIER


GREGORY SWANWICK


PROFESSOR GREGORY SWANWICK is the current Dean of Education with the College of Psychiatrists of Ireland and a Consultant Psychiatrist in the Psychiatry of Old Age based at Tallaght University Hospital.

ANGELA TYSALL


MARK WOODBURY-SMITH


BOOKING OPTIONS

Registration for this event is available for members in your membership account. If you are already logged in please click to register. If you are not logged in please do so before here:

Registration for this event is also available for non-members. Please contact Jennie on 01-6618450 or jdalton@irishpsychiatry.ie for registration details.

VENUE

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